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Partner connections

Brand Tasmania is at its most effective when Partners work with the Brand Tasmania Council to champion the State’s place-of-origin brand. The monthly publication Partner Connections serves to link Brand Tasmania with its Partners and Partners with each other. This newsletter introduces new Partners and emerging sectors, as well as profiling existing Partners who have achieved success. Where appropriate, we encourage Partners to consider other Tasmanian-based businesses when buying goods or services. View a listing of Partners by sector.

Partner Connections November 2017

Partner Connections Nov 2017 - Kooee Snacks

Welcome to the first edition of Partner Connections.

Each edition will introduce new Partners, profile existing Partners who have achieved success and promote upcoming events that assist you in developing your business.

In this first edition we congratulate Kooee! Snacks on securing distribution for its beef jerky in Woolworths. We welcome new Partners Swinging Gate Vineyard, Oyster Cove Marina and Penguin Composites.

23 November 2017, November 2017

Latest partners

Listed below are businesses recently approved as Brand Tasmania Partners. We encourage you to familiarise yourself with each of these businesses.

Tourism Brochure Exchange

A Tasmanian company formed in 1990 to distribute tourism information via various mediums: brochures, digital app, screen network, posters and co-op TV.

Tourism Brochure Exchange was established in 1990 to promote the distribution of professional brochure displays throughout Tasmania.

We are Tasmania’s statewide distributor of travel information. With an extensive state-wide network of over 200 locations including major hotels, airports and the Tourism Hub on the Spirit of Tasmania.

Our digital app 'Brochure Buddy' is a successful digital means to upload specific tourism content. And our recently launched Tasmanian Tourism Exchange gives operators cost effective co-op TVC to capture intrastate business.

Poster Impact distributes event collateral for the Arts & Entertainment industries.

Contact name Andrew Stack
Phone 03 6274 1266
Email andrew.stack@tbetas.com.au
Website www.tourismbrochureexchange.com.au
Categories: Media and entertainment, Services, Tourism

wukalina Walk

The Walk is the first of its kind in Australia - designed, owned and operated by the Aboriginal community. The purpose of the Walk is to deliver a cultural experience that deepens understanding of palawa (Tasmanian Aboriginal) culture and community.

The wukalina Walk is a three night - four day, fully inclusive, guided walk, incorporating coastal and inland aspects of the famous Bay of Fires region - the cultural homeland of the palawa. Up to ten guests and two guides spend two nights in bespoke palawa inspired (domed) huts, within a standing camp in the National Park, and one night in a meticulously renovated Lighthouse Keepers Cottage on Aboriginal held land at larapuna/Eddystone Point.

While walking in the footsteps of their traditional people, the palawa guides and Elders will relate first-hand, the palawa creation story, and you will participate in cultural practices that have been passed down for hundreds of generations. The structure and delivery of the Walk is along the same lines as more established walks such as, the Bay of Fires Walk, the Freycinet Experience Walk and the Maria Island Walk.

The Walk is classified as moderate in terms of level of difficulty.

Contact name Gill Parssey
Phone 0447 244 727
Email admin@wukalinawalk.com.au
Website www.wukalinawalk.com.au
Categories: Tourism

Elphinstone Pty Ltd

Elphinstone Pty Ltd is a leading manufacturer of quality products for the global underground and surface mining industries. Elphinstone Pty Ltd forms part of the Elphinstone Group.

Based in Tasmania, Australia, Elphinstone Pty Ltd is an established Caterpillar Original Equipment Manufacturer with over 40 years’ experience in the mining industry. Elphinstone specialises in the design, manufacture and support of quality equipment for the global underground, surface mining and rail maintenance industries.

Current products include the Haulmax extended distance, off-highway haul truck; the technologically advanced Railmax road-rail excavator and Elphinstone underground mining support vehicles. As an authorised Caterpillar Original Equipment Manufacturer, all Elphinstone products are sold and supported via the global Cat dealer network.

Contact name Kelly Elphinstone
Phone 03 6442 7777
Email kelphinstone@elphinstone.com
Website www.elphinstone.com
Categories: Manufacturing

Loaves & Fishes Tasmania

Loaves & Fishes Tasmania is a not-for-profit social enterprise selling a locally made range of condiments to fund its community work.

Loaves & Fishes Tasmania is a not-for-profit organisation that uses a mix of local produce from fruit and vegetables farmers and distributors that would normally go to waste, along with generous donations from supermarkets, shops and individuals. These meals are prepared by students, community and corporate groups who gain valuable skills in food preparation and enhance their employment options under the supervision of a qualified chef.

These meals will be funded by the sale of a range of jams, chutneys and sauces made in Devonport from a majority of Tasmanian ingredients.

All profits from the sale of these products are returned to the Tasmanian community as emergency food relief through appropriate agencies, skill training and mentoring.

Contact name Aaron Kropf
Phone 03 6424 6278
Email kym.roberts@loavesandfishestasmania.org.au
Website loavesandfishestasmania.org.au
Categories: Food and beverage, Services

Huon Valley Council

The Huon Valley Council is the southernmost local government area in Australia. The area retains the beauty, charm and heritage of a bygone era, yet it is only a 30-minute drive from Hobart. The main townships are Huonville, Franklin, Cygnet, Geeveston.

The Huon Valley is a vibrant, semi-rural community, 30 minutes south of Tasmania’s capital city, Hobart. It is Australia’s southernmost municipal area with a population of more than 16,000 people.

The Valley’s 5,497 square kilometres are dominated by meandering waterways and forested hills. The region’s fertile landscape produces a dazzling array of quality foods that has helped Tasmania earn its reputation as a food lover’s paradise.

The Huon Valley is also a haven for yachting and boating enthusiasts with easy access to the Huon River and D’Entrecasteaux Channel. These waters offer world class fishing, sailing, diving and rowing.

The area is also renowned for its produce, award-winning wine, cider, seafood, fruit and other gourmet delicacies. The gourmet food festival, Taste of the Huon, held each year in March, is a weekend celebration of the best produce the Valley has to offer.

Contact name Economic Development Officer
Phone 03 6264 0300
Email pvenning@huonvalley.tas.gov.au
Website www.huonvalley.tas.gov.au
Categories: Services, Tourism

Island Gourmet

Producer of fresh and frozen meals, soups, casseroles, lasagna's, precooked roasts and vegetables

HACCP accreditted food manufacture based in Launceston. We manufacture under 2 brands.
FIT meals in minutes Tasmania is designed and manufactured with the assistance of a dietitian-nutritionist to offer healthy frozen meals. We cook fresh meats and our fresh processed vegetables, we make our own sauces using as much fresh local produce as practical. Our other main brand is Island Gourmet which offers a range of family friendly home style meal such as casseroles, pasta sauces, lasagnas, family pies, slow cooked roasts, ready to cook vegetables all manufactured in Launceston.

Contact name Grant Neighbour
Phone 03 6334 1707
Email grant@islandgourmet.net.au
Website www.islandgourmet.net.au
Categories: Food and beverage

Penguin Composites

We are a local company specialising in Composite product primarily incorporating fibreglass. We also manufacture a range of slideon campers and caravans under the brand Islander Campers

Penguin Composites is a Tasmanian-owned private company operating on the North West Coast of Tasmania (Australia) since 1976.

We employ an average of 40 fulltime staff, with skills in Composite Reinforced Plastics, CAD Design, Welding, Engineering, and Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing.

The firm has developed considerable expertise in the application of GRP product in a number of environments including industrial, mining, defense, marine and recreational areas. Staff are regularly involved with customers in product design and customisation.

Components manufactured by Penguin Composites are exporting to many interstate and international destinations.

Contact name David Mercer
Phone 03 6437 2791
Email ceo@penguincomposites.com.au
Website penguincomposites.com.au
Categories: Antarctic and Southern Ocean, Manufacturing, Minerals and mining

Cradle Coast Authority

Regional voice for North West Tasmania, established by the nine Local Government Councils to represent and advocate the needs of the region.

The Authority collaborates and facilitates a diverse range of projects and initiatives involving all tiers of government, industry and the community.

Our three areas of focus are Regional Economic Development, Natural Resource Management and Tourism.

Contact name Nani Clark
Phone 03 6433 8446
Email nclark@cradlecoast.com
Website www.cradlecoast.com
Categories: Tourism

Glen Dhu Children’s Services Pty Ltd

Education and care service for 0–5 yr old children

A small family owned Tasmanian business in operation for over 20 years
Rated on the highest Australian assessment exceeding national quality standards, we run an education service for children in our purpose build natural setting. Employing 18 highly qualified professional educators and early childhood teachers. We also facilitate conferences with interstate presenters for local educators

Contact name Mel Reid
Phone 03 6344 4628
Email glendhuchildcare@gmail.com
Website www.glendhuchildcare.com.au
Categories: Education

Joanna Gair Paper

Tasmanian handmade paper studio, specialising in Tasmanian botanical and recycled textile papers

Handmade in Tasmania by artisan papermaker Joanna Gair (of Roo Poo Paper fame) this tiny, eco friendly paper mill specialises in papers made from Tasmanian plant fibres blended with recycled cotton.*

Using first century techniques and traditional equipment, each sheet of paper is made entirely by hand with the utmost dedication to environmental practices. Offering a core range of wholesale greeting cards and fine art prints, as well as specialty corporate ranges such as Whisky Paper for Lark's distillery and Beer Paper for Boags Brewery. Joanna also makes bespoke paper products, and includes Tetsuya Wakuda, Sean Connery and as clients.

*Recycled cotton sourced and processed by Vincent Industries, an Australian Disability Enterprise.

Contact name Joanna Gair
Phone 0405 742 174
Email info@joannagairpaper.com
Website www.joannagairpaper.com
Categories: Arts, Manufacturing, Textile, clothing and footwear, Tourism

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Facts about Tasmania

Tasmania

Tasmania is the southernmost state of Australia, located at latitude 40° south and longitude 144° east and separated from the continent by Bass Strait. It is a group of 334 islands, with the main island being 315 km (180 miles) from west to east and 286 km (175 miles) north to south.

Tasmania

Tasmanians are resourceful and innovative people, committed to a continually expanding export sector. In 2012–13, international exports from the state totalled $3.04 billion. USA, China, Taiwan, India, Japan and other Asian countries account for the bulk of exports, with goods and services also exported to Europe and many other regions.

Geography

Tasmania is similar in size to the Republic of Ireland or Sri Lanka. The Tasmanian islands have a combined coastline of more than 3,000 km.

Geography

The main island has a land area of 62,409 sq km (24,096 sq miles) and the minor islands, taken together, total only 6 per cent of the main island’s land area. The biggest islands are Flinders (1,374 sq km/539 sq miles), King, Cape Barren, Bruny and Macquarie Islands.

Geography

About 250km (150 miles) separates Tasmania’s main island from continental Australia. The Kent Group of Islands, one of the most northerly parts of the state, is only 55km (34 miles) from the coast of the Australian continent.

Climate

Twice named ‘Best Temperate Island in the World’ by international travel magazine Conde Nast Traveler, Tasmania has a mild, temperate maritime climate, with four distinct seasons.

Climate

In summer (December to February) the average maximum temperature is 21° Celsius (70° Fahrenheit). In winter (June to August) the average maximum is 12° C (52° F) and the average minimum is 4° C (40° F). Snow often falls in the highlands, but is rarely experienced in more settled areas.

Annual Rainfall

Tasmania’s west coast is one of the wettest places in the world, but the eastern part of the State lives in a rain-shadow. Hobart, the second-driest capital city in Australia, receives about half as much rain as Sydney.

Annual Rainfall

Annual rainfall in the west is 2,400 mm (95 inches), but hardy locals insist there is no such thing as bad weather, only inadequate clothing. If you travel 120 km east to Hobart, you experience a much drier average of 626 mm (24 inches) a year.

Population

The 512,875-strong community spreads itself across the land; less urbanised than the population of any other Australian state. Hobart, the capital city, is home to more than 212,000 people.

Capital City

Hobart nestles at the foot of kunanyi / Mount Wellington (1,270 m / 4,000 ft) and overlooks the Derwent Estuary, where pods of dolphins and migrating whales are sometimes seen from nearby beaches. Surrounded by thickly forested rolling hills, the city is home to the state parliament and the main campus of the University of Tasmania.

Capital City

Its historic centre features Georgian and Regency buildings from colonial times. Hobart is home port for coastal fishing boats, Antarctic expeditions and vessels that fish the Southern Ocean.

Land Formation

Mountain ranges in the south-west date back 1,000 million years. Ancient sediments were deeply buried, folded and heated under enormous pressure to form schists and glistening white quartzites.

Land Formation

In the south-west and central highlands, dolerite caps many mountains, including Precipitous Bluff and Tasmania’s highest peak, Mt Ossa (1617 m / 5300 ft). More than 42 per cent of Tasmania is World Heritage Area, national park and marine or forest reserves.

Flora

Vegetation is diverse, from alpine heathlands and tall open eucalypt forests to areas of temperate rainforests and moorlands, known as buttongrass plains. Many plants are unique to Tasmania and the ancestors of some species grew on the ancient super-continent, Gondwana, before it broke up 50 million years ago.

Flora

Unique native conifers include slow-growing Huon pines, with one specimen on Mt Read estimated to be up to 10,000 years old. Lomatia tasmanica, commonly known as King’s holly, is a self-cloning shrub that may well be the oldest living organism on earth. It was discovered in 1937.

Fauna

Tasmania is the last refuge of several mammals that once roamed the Australian continent. It is the only place to see a Tasmanian devil or eastern quoll (native cat) in the wild and is the best place to see the spotted-tailed quoll (tiger cat), all carnivorous marsupials.

Fauna

The eastern bettong and the Tasmanian pademelon, both now extinct on the Australian continent, may also be observed.

Fauna

The Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was Australia’s largest surviving carnivorous marsupial and is a modern day mystery. The last documented thylacine died in captivity in 1936 and although the animal is considered extinct, unsubstantiated sightings persist.

History and Heritage

Aboriginal people have lived in Tasmania for about 35,000 years, since well before the last Ice Age. They were isolated from the Australian continent about 12,000 years ago, when the seas rose to flood low coastal plains and form Bass Strait.

History and Heritage

Descendants of the original people are part of modern Tasmania’s predominantly Anglo-Celtic population.

History and Heritage

Tasmania was originally named Van Dieman’s Land by the Dutch explorer Abel Janszoon Tasman in 1642. The island was settled by the British as a penal colony in 1803 and the original name was associated with the convict era. It was changed to Tasmania when convict transportation stopped in 1853.

Economy

A resourceful island culture has generated leading-edge niche industries, from production of high-speed catamaran ferries and marine equipment to lightning-protection technology.

Economy

Tasmanians produce winches and windlasses for some of the world’s biggest ocean-going pleasure craft; large-scale inflatable evacuation systems and provide specialist outfit-accommodation services to the marine industry.

Economy

The Wooden Boat Centre at Shipwrights Point has re-established the skills and traditions of another age and attracts students from around the world.

Economy

Tasmania is a world leader in natural turf systems for major sporting arenas and in areas of mining technology and environmental management. Its aquaculture industry has developed ground-breaking fish-feeding technology and new packaging.

Economy

Tasmanians sell communications equipment to many navies and their world-class fine timber designers and craftsmen take orders internationally for furniture made from distinctive local timber.

Economy

The state is a natural larder with clean air, unpolluted water and rich soils inviting the production of 100 varieties of specialty cheeses, as well as other dairy products, mouth-watering rock lobsters, oysters, scallops and abalone, Atlantic salmon, beef, premium beers, leatherwood honey, mineral waters, fine chocolates, fresh berry fruits, apples and crisp vegetables.

Economy

Tasmania is a producer of award-winning cool-climate wines, beers, ciders and whiskies. Other export products include essential oils such as lavender, pharmaceutical products and premium wool sought after in Europe and Asia. Hobart is a vital gateway to the Antarctic and a centre for Southern Ocean and polar research.

Economy

The industries in Tasmania which made the greatest contribution to the State’s gross product in 2010–11 in volume terms were: Manufacturing (9.4%), Health care and social assistance (8.2%), Financial and insurance services (7.2%), Ownership of dwellings and Agriculture, forestry and fishing (each 7.1%).

Getting to Tasmania

Travel is easy, whether by air from Sydney or Melbourne, or by sea, with daily sailings of the twin ferries Spirit of Tasmania 1 and 2 each way between Melbourne and Devonport throughout the year.

This site has been produced by the Brand Tasmania Council © 2014

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